Water is the key!

Water Intake, Diet And Weight

About 50-70 percent of the human body is composed of water. The exact amount of bodily water varies according to age and the proportion of muscle-to-fat (muscle contains more water than fat.) Although water contains no calories and may have no nutrients, it is essential for life. We can survive for weeks without food, but only a matter of days without water.

Because we do not store excess water, we must ensure that our daily diet contains a sufficient supply to maintain adequate health. It's extremely difficult to take in too much water. If we drink too much, our body simply adjusts by increasing the amount of liquid we urinate. However, if our water level inside our body falls too low, we experience several symptoms that warn us we may be dehydrating.

The principal symptom is thirst, a reaction influenced by a group of nerve cells located in the hypothalamus, located at the base of the brain.

Health Benefits of Water

Although water contains no calories and may contain no micronutrients, it is an indispensable aid to digestion, nutrient absorption and waste-elimination. It also helps regulate circulation, body temperature and a host of other biochemical reactions. Water lubricates joints and maintains healthy skin. It's worth remembering that we can exist without food for months, but without water for only a few days.

Effect Of Water On Weight Gain And Weight Loss

Because the human body contains so much water, rising or falling levels may cause an equal increase or decrease in our weight. For example, water retention (sometimes called edema or oedema) with accompanying weight gain, is a common symptom of PMS and Menopause. While a very low carbohydrate diet typically leads to a loss of water (because carbs bind with water) leading to a rapid initial loss of weight. Weight loss is also a common symptom of dehydration.